Utah’s Employment Summary: November 2021

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The following statistics are presented comparing November 2019 to November 2021.


(Nov. 17, 2021) Utah’s nonfarm payroll employment for November 2021 increased an estimated 3.6% across the past 24 months, with the state’s economy adding a cumulative 57,900 jobs since November 2019. Utah’s current employment level stands at 1,646,900.


November’s seasonally-adjusted unemployment rate is estimated at 2.1%, with approximately 34,500 Utahns unemployed. Utah’s October unemployment rate is unchanged at 2.2%. The November national unemployment rate continued to decline, registering 4.2%.


“While the supply of available labor keeps shrinking, the Utah economy continues to grow” reported Mark Knold, Chief Economist at the Department of Workforce Services. “These seem like contradictory forces, yet the Utah economy continues to expand. Utah leads the nation in job growth. Our economy cannot grow like this unless it is finding the labor it needs. So far that challenge is being met.”


Utah’s November private sector employment recorded a two-year expansion of 4.7%. Eight of Utah’s 10 major private-sector industry groups posted net two-year job gains, led by Trade, Transportation and Utilities (21,100 jobs); Professional and Business Services (16,800 jobs); Construction (9,400 jobs); and Manufacturing (8,300 jobs). The two industry groups with less employment than two years ago are Leisure and Hospitality Services (-1,600 jobs); and Natural Resources and Mining (-900 jobs).


 

Largest private sector gains in the past two years:

  • Trade, Transportation and Utilities: 21,100 jobs

  • Professional and Business Services: 16,800 jobs

  • Construction: 9,400 jobs

  • Manufacturing: 8,300 jobs


Largest private sector losses during the past two years:

  • Leisure and Hospitality Services: -1,600 jobs

  • Natural Resources and Mining: -900 jobs


Statistics generated by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington, D.C., modeled from monthly employer (employment) and household (unemployment) surveys.


Listen to Chief Economist Mark Knold shares his analysis of the November 2021 employment report: